Treating the Whole Trauma Patient

Treating the Whole Trauma Patient

Motor vehicle accidents. Gunshot wounds. Workplace accidents. When we think of a trauma patient, the intense physical recovery from their injuries is what often comes to mind. And while treating those injuries is of great importance, a full recovery is much more complex. In order to treat the whole trauma patient, we must also consider the mental and emotional side of trauma.

Trauma can be defined as any life-threatening event or a psychologically devastating event that can affect a person's capacity to deal with it, or affect their coping mechanisms. This can be very overwhelming for the patient, which can hinder their recovery.

Or worse.

People who have experienced trauma are 15 times more likely to commit suicide. It is imperative that people who have experienced a traumatic event get the support and guidance that they need from those around them.

A treatment plan that works with the trauma patient and their family to address these concerns is critical to achieving the goal of returning the patient to their community.

Patients who have experienced trauma often struggle to understand what happened to them. They wonder "why me?" and may struggle with communicating effectively. This can lead to outbursts, mood swings, and different behavioral patterns. Understanding this and adapting their treatment plan accordingly is key to their recovery.

If you or your loved one has experienced a traumatic event, please speak with your care team to ensure you receive the support and resources you need.

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Kelsi Clark, RN is a nurse supervisor at Vibra Hospital of Denver. A graduate of Concorde Career College, Kelsi is very passionate about nursing and began her career at Vibra as a CNA. Kelsi and her husband love to spend time with their family, especially outdoors, and have another baby on the way.

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